REPORT POTENTIAL INVASIVE SPECIES
Idaho Invasive Species Hotline [toll-free]:
1-877-336-8676

Boaters, Fisherman, and WaterFowl Hunters: CLEAN, DRAIN, DRY

When working or playing in Idaho’s waters, you can do some simple things to minimize the likelihood of moving aquatic invasive species (AIS). Knowing which waters contain AIS and how to reduce the chances of these species spreading is essential. That is why implementing the following habits into your routine is critical in stopping the introduction and spread of AIS in Idaho.

Reduce your chances of Moving aquatic hitchhikers:

Clean

Clean

Drain

Drain

Drain Live Wells

Drain Live Wells

Dry

Dry

1. Clean

Before leaving any waterbody, always inspect equipment (boats, planes, trailers, decoy anchors, scuba gear, and lures) for visible plants and animals. Remove this material on site. Carefully check places that are still damp. Dispose of the removed material in a trash receptacle or on high, dry ground where there is no danger of it washing into a waterbody.

2. DRAIN

Eliminate water from all equipment, including motors, live wells, wakeboard ballast tanks, boat hulls, scuba gear, bait buckets, waders, and boots.

3. DRY

Clean and dry anything that came in contact with water (boats, decoys, trailers, equipment, clothing, dogs, etc.).

Completely dry your boat, trailer and all water related equipment before launching in another water body.

Quick Tips

Boot wash stations are showing up at various business locations throughout Idaho and NW Region to assist in the cleaning of wading gear.

Boot wash stations are showing up at various business locations throughout Idaho and NW Region to assist in the cleaning of wading gear.

  • Waterfowl Hunters: use elliptical, bulb-shaped, or strap anchors on decoys, which avoid collecting submerged and floating aquatic plants. Be sure to remove aquatic plants, animals, and mud that are attached to decoy lines or anchors.
  • Anglers: be aware that AIS can lodge in nets and other equipment and can be unintentionally transported into non-infested waters.  Clean, drain, and dry all water-related equipment before traveling to a new destination.
  • Hunters and Anglers:  remember to clean, drain and dry all wading equipment. Use fresh water and a stiff brush to remove any attached debris and pay close attention to the outer sole tread, felt (if applicable), tongue, and laces.  After a thorough cleaning (stream-side or at home), allow wading equipment to completely dry in the sun.


Inspection stations are Idaho’s front line of defense against the introduction of invasive species, so please be prepared to have your watercraft checked.

Why Should I clean-drain-dry?

because AQUATIC INVASIVE SPECIES HAVE BECOME ONE OF THE BIGGEST THREATS TO ALL WATERWAYS.

The Zebra and Quagga Mussel are on the top of the list for the damage they will cause.

 

Zebra and Quagga Mussels are freshwater bivalve mollusks that can:

  • attach to hard surfaces,
  • rapidly reproduce,
  • filter large amounts of nutrients from the water,
  • survive out of the water for 30 days which allows them to be carried by boats from one waterway to another.

Impacts of their introduction will be experienced by everyone through: 

  • increases in utility rates,
  • impacts in irrigation,
  • increases in food production costs,
  • damage to boats and clog intakes,
  • damage to fisheries and aquatic habitat,
  • degrading water quality,
  • impacts in recreation and tourism,
  • reductions in property values.

OTHER AQUATIC INVASIVE SPECIES to look out for

INVASIVE PLANTS are also a concern

Aquatic plants can hitch a ride on boots, clothes, waders, boats, trailers, and towing vehicles. Before leaving each site, please practice Clean, Drain, and Dry on everything that took part in your adventure.

Eurasian watermilfoil

Eurasian watermilfoil

Photos Credit: (clean, drain, drain live well, dry) Bethany Muffley, ISDA / (equipment) NYSDEC / (boot wash station) Nic Zurfluh, ISDA / (Idaho license plate) Bethany Muffley, ISDA / (nz mudsnail) Robyn Draheim, USFWS-Pacific Region / (asian clam) Robyn Draheim, USFWS-Pacific Region / (spiny waterflea) Kevin Keeler and Lynn Lesko, US Geological Survey / (bait bucket) Shari Winsheimer / (eurasian watermilfoil) Tom Woolf, ISDA.