early detection monitoring program

To protect Idaho from invasive species, it is important to stop new outbreaks before they start. By the time an invader is readily noticeable and begins to cause damage, it is often too late. It can be challenging and expensive to remove an established invader. However, by detecting new outbreaks early and acting quickly to control them, we can avoid many of the environmental and economic losses caused by invasive species.

The early detection monitoring program involves survey and sample collection for invasive plants, snails, clams, mussels, and crayfish. In 2015, efforts collected 690 plankton samples from 70 Idaho waterbodies. To date, no evidence of mussels has been found in Idaho or anywhere in the Columbia River Basin.

Water Hyacinth Removal

Water Hyacinth Removal

New Zealand Mud Snail

New Zealand Mud Snail

Veliger Sample Collection

Veliger Sample Collection

Surveys in 2015 also identified new populations of Eurasian watermilfoil in the Hagerman area (Twin Falls County) and in Oxbow Reservoir (Adams County); flowering rush in Blackfoot Reservoir (Caribou and Bingham Counties); curlyleaf pondweed in Mud Lake (Jefferson County); Chinese mystery snails in Spirit Lake (Kootenai County); and Asian clams, channeled apple snails and hydrilla in geothermal waters in Twin Falls County.

Assistance with early detection monitoring

A number of partners assist with early detection monitoring and include: the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ), Shoshone Piute Tribe, Coeur d’Alene Tribe, Idaho Power Company, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Forest Service, lake associations as well as various canal companies and irrigation districts around the state.

 

Success Stories